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1050 Danforth Ave
Toronto, ON, M4J 1M2
CANADA

416-461-6061

Foundation Problems (Pics!)

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Extra thoughts on current series and events.

Foundation Problems (Pics!)

Pastor Charles

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As current worshippers at DCC know, we're Leaning In in prayer this year as we're seeking God's face for the move of His Spirit in our midst, so that we can be Reaching Out in 2018. This is our theme for the year: Leaning In, Reaching Out. There is an essential, irreducible component here: God's actions always include both - His work in us results in His work through us to those around us. 

As current worshippers at DCC know, we're also engaging a building proposal and prayerfully considering it for our future. Why? Because our building is NOT the "church" (because the Church is people, not properties). Rather, the building and property are tools in our hands. What are the tools for? To fulfill our mission and calling. What is our mission and calling? 

We exist to be and to make fully committed imitators of Jesus in the areas of Danforth and East York! We do this by Loving God, Loving Others, and Serving Our World.

Our building is now 70 years old, though the congregation is much older. In fact, our roots go back to the Hebden Mission itself more than 100 years ago! This is at least the 3rd property the church has owned and operated, all for the purpose of the propagation of the Gospel. 

But it no longer serves us well in that regard, as it is too limited in functionality, and it has multiple issues, including the foundation. Thus, we must act responsibly and strategically in the management of our building and property to empower ministry, not restrict it. 

Most people don't see (yes, literally "see") these issues because it's not germane to coming to the building to worship or minister, nor are most people part of the maintenance staff, nor governance of daily operations. Thus, hearing we have foundation problems might come as a surprise, or be easily dismissed because they don't "see" the problems. 

So, to rectify that, I'm posting the pictures here taken over the past 2+ years: 

FRONT WEST STAIRWELL

 Water damage from seepage: We spent $15K fixing the outside before verifying this dried up the problem - at least for now. This picture shows new metal studs being put in place for a drywall covering. (The $15K "fix" was less than the big fix of $50K. Yikes.) 

Water damage from seepage: We spent $15K fixing the outside before verifying this dried up the problem - at least for now. This picture shows new metal studs being put in place for a drywall covering. (The $15K "fix" was less than the big fix of $50K. Yikes.) 

 Closer view from the bottom looking up. Here and other location show the cement parging has completely separated from the brick and block foundation. Continued water seepage will further degrade the mortar between the bricks and blocks, ultimately leading to foundation failure. 

Closer view from the bottom looking up. Here and other location show the cement parging has completely separated from the brick and block foundation. Continued water seepage will further degrade the mortar between the bricks and blocks, ultimately leading to foundation failure. 

 Close up at the bottom of the stairs where seepage was the worst. A panel was installed here so we can continue to open the panel and view the wall condition. 

Close up at the bottom of the stairs where seepage was the worst. A panel was installed here so we can continue to open the panel and view the wall condition. 

WEST REAR STORAGE HALLWAY

 Remember the huge cabinets lining the outside wall? When they were pulled back, they were so full of mould that most of them had to be thrown away. Again you can see the mould and mildew, indications of how persistent and bad the water seepage was. 

Remember the huge cabinets lining the outside wall? When they were pulled back, they were so full of mould that most of them had to be thrown away. Again you can see the mould and mildew, indications of how persistent and bad the water seepage was. 

 Mould and mildew had penetrated into the cabinets: Supplies stored inside were so infected, they, too, had to be thrown away. Here you can see seepage was at both the higher groundlevel outside and at the footing level on the bottom. 

Mould and mildew had penetrated into the cabinets: Supplies stored inside were so infected, they, too, had to be thrown away. Here you can see seepage was at both the higher groundlevel outside and at the footing level on the bottom. 

 A broad view of the read storage wall behind the cabinets, showing seepage high and low. 

A broad view of the read storage wall behind the cabinets, showing seepage high and low. 

EAST SIDE FURNACE ROOM AND C.E. ROOM WALLS

 Every Fall and Spring we have have standing water in the furnace room. This picture isn't too bad. Two years ago it was over an inch deep covering half the room.  

Every Fall and Spring we have have standing water in the furnace room. This picture isn't too bad. Two years ago it was over an inch deep covering half the room.  

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 During the Nursery/CE Room renovation, removing the existing walls, we discovered the metal studs and sill plate (running on the floor, on which all studs rest) had completely rusted away. That is evidence of longstanding moisture in this location. In other words, this is a continuing problem that will not "go away" because we ignore it. 

During the Nursery/CE Room renovation, removing the existing walls, we discovered the metal studs and sill plate (running on the floor, on which all studs rest) had completely rusted away. That is evidence of longstanding moisture in this location. In other words, this is a continuing problem that will not "go away" because we ignore it. 

 In another location, removing the pink fibreglass insulation reveals the level of damage to the foundation wall itself and old defunct pipes that add to the problem. 

In another location, removing the pink fibreglass insulation reveals the level of damage to the foundation wall itself and old defunct pipes that add to the problem. 

 Detail shot of rust, mould, mildew and general deteriorating wall material building up on one of the old defunct pipes. All this and more are hiding behind our drywall on the actual foundation walls.

Detail shot of rust, mould, mildew and general deteriorating wall material building up on one of the old defunct pipes. All this and more are hiding behind our drywall on the actual foundation walls.

These problems on the East foundation wall, where our "green lot" is, have not yet been addressed on the exterior of the building. We will have to spend more thousands of dollars to address the drainage problems affecting the East side of our foundation. 

EAST WALL, FELLOWSHIP HALL

 Starting in the corner closest to the CE Room/Nursery entrance, here you can see evidence of long-standing moisture degrading the metal studs and drywall. This points to more foundation problems moving all the way along the East foundation wall. 

Starting in the corner closest to the CE Room/Nursery entrance, here you can see evidence of long-standing moisture degrading the metal studs and drywall. This points to more foundation problems moving all the way along the East foundation wall. 

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FRONT EAST STAIRWELL 

 Anywhere you see places where something behind the drywall is PUSHING OUT from the surface, this is evidence of moisture actively seeping through, rusting and eroding our foundation structure. 

Anywhere you see places where something behind the drywall is PUSHING OUT from the surface, this is evidence of moisture actively seeping through, rusting and eroding our foundation structure. 

 Multiple points pushing OUT from moisture seepage, here in the front East stairwell, plus evidence the drywall was repaired years ago ... thus this is a longstanding, ongoing issue that will not "go away" if we just ignore it. 

Multiple points pushing OUT from moisture seepage, here in the front East stairwell, plus evidence the drywall was repaired years ago ... thus this is a longstanding, ongoing issue that will not "go away" if we just ignore it. 

WHAT DO ALL THESE PICTURES MEAN? 

Our building will not, fall down on us today or tomorrow. But it does mean that our building will not continue to serve the coming decades and generations. If we want (and we do want) to serve not only ourselves but also the coming generations, then we must act now to move in the right direction. The building proposal before us addresses these issues and more, empowering us with the new building, greater space designed to meet our current and future needs, to glorify God and serve our community. 

Come, let us build together for today and for the future!